White Chocolate-Maple Almond Butter

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Some people dream of accomplishing grand feats like curing malignant diseases or becoming president. Me? I dreamed of making homemade nut butter. Perhaps my dream seems petty to you, but there was a fierce fire within me that desired to achieve it.

Much like anyone else chasing a dream, I had many obstacles standing in my way. Okay, so I only had one obstacle, but it was progress-halting all the same. As you might’ve heard me complain about before, my “food processor” was a big fat piece of poop, and did about as much food-processing as I could if I chewed things up with my mouth and spit ‘em back out.

But like a gift from God (or Santa), I received a REAL food processor for Christmas. It was the tool my dreams required in order to be realized. It didn’t take me long to bust that baby out and get down to nut butter business.

Get a look at my smooth White Chocolate-Maple Almond Butter. If I had made that in my old “food processor,” the texture would be more resembling of play-doh than butter. But here, we have a creamy, dreamy consistency that’s still rich and thick like nut butter should be.DSC_9212

But friends, this ain’t your ordinary almond butter. It’s kissed with buttery maple flavor and laced with a touch of sweet white chocolate, both of which wonderfully compliment the almonds’ natural salty flavor. I also added some pecans to the mix, so this is technically Almond-Pecan Butter, but that’s just making things too wordy now.

With all those wonderful components, you wind up with a very complex flavor, where each individual flavor is identifiable while simultaneously working in harmony with the others. How does that work? You have to taste it to understand.

The most awesome thing about almond butter is that it’s one of these easiest things you can make at home, and you can save tons of money doing so. Store-bought nut butter’s expensive, so save yourself a buck or two, and you can whip together this addicting White Chocolate-Maple Almond Butter in minutes.

A Few Tips Before You Get Cooking:

  1. It’s going to take a few minutes to get to the right consistency, so be patient.
  2. Also, wait until the almond butter has processed a while before adding a second teaspoon of oil because it might just need a few minutes to let the nuts’ natural oils release.
  3. Almond butter, and nut butter in general, is super flexible. Mix up flavors and add-ins as you please, or keep it plain!
  4. Mother Cookie asked me, “What do you do with almond butter?” It’s just like peanut butter; spread it on anything you like, or dip stuff in it. Possibilities include, but are not limited to: bread, celery sticks, pretzel sticks, apple slices, crackers, graham crackers, pound cake, brownies, or warm crescent rolls.DSC_9194

White Chocolate-Maple Almond Butter
By The Smart Cookie Cook

Ingredients:

  • 1 ½ cups whole raw almonds
  • 1 cup raw pecans
  • ¾ cup white chocolate chips
  • 1 tsp. maple extract
  • 1-2 tsp. vegetable oil
  • Pinch salt, optional

Directions:

  1. In the bowl of a food processor, process nuts until they resemble a fine crumb. Add white chocolate chips and continue to process, scraping down sides occasionally, until it starts to smooth and clump up like paste.DSC_9126DSC_9130-2
  2. Add maple extract and 1 tsp. vegetable oil, and salt if desired, and continue to process until totally smooth and peanut butter-like in texture. This may take 5+ minutes. If yours is too thick, add another tsp. of olive oil.
  3. Store in an air-tight container and enjoy!

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6 thoughts on “White Chocolate-Maple Almond Butter

  1. Pingback: The Weekender: Back to School, Valentine’s Day Prep, & Deep-Fried Bliss «

  2. Pingback: Chocolate Coconut Cashew Butter |

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